September 26, 2019

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MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Dear friends,

Each of us has a different path that brought us to the ACLU. My own path started in the 1970s, as a young girl listening to my mother talk about her work at the national ACLU Women’s Rights Project.

I learned early that the promises of the Constitution were not applied equally to everyone. But I also learned that when people come together to fight for justice and equality, change can happen.

Together, we are daring to create a world where we are all free to dream and learn and act. Together, we will create a more perfect union.

And so it was that 50 years ago, a small group of dedicated people came together to form what would become the ACLU of Maine. They believed passionately in the promise of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. They understood that America is a work in progress, and they believed that the work was worth doing.

50 years later, we believe it more than ever. It has been two years since President Trump was elected. In that time, you have spoken out and taken a stand more than ever before. And you have supported the ACLU.

Thank you. Because of your support, we have grown our staff and increased our impact. We are tackling more and accomplishing more, on every front – in the courtroom, in the legislature, and in the community. Whether you came to the ACLU 50 years ago or two, we are so glad you’re here.

Sincerely,

Alison Beyea, Executive Director

WE THE PEOPLE DARE TO IMAGINE A WORLD WHERE WE BUILD COMMUNITIES AND FAMILIES, NOT WALLS AND PRISONS.

Families belong together. The ACLU has been fighting the Trump administration’s family separation policies since February, when we filed the first lawsuit challenging the practice of taking children away from their parents at the border. Our lawsuit – plus the thousands of people nationwide who took to the streets to protest – pressured the administration to stop separating families, and a federal judge ordered all the families reunited. Now we’re on the ground, working to find the parents who have been lost in the system so that they can be reunited with their children.

Together, we pressured the Trump administration to stop separating families. Now we’re working to reunite them.

Justice should be fair. Together, we put an end to the automatic suspension of driver’s licenses over missed fine payments. The ability to drive is crucial to nearly all of us, and taking away a license can hurt entire families. The new law goes into effect in December, and will have a profound impact on the people of Maine – helping people get back on track, instead of punishing them for being poor.

Kids don’t belong in prison. With your help, we’re calling on Maine to rethink its approach to juvenile justice. This spring, we filed a lawsuit on behalf of A.I., an 11-yearold boy with mental illness who was beaten up by two guards at the Long Creek youth prison. And 500 of you signed our petition asking Maine legislators to hold oversight hearings to find out what’s going wrong there. It worked – the legislature held the first hearing, an important first step toward holding the government accountable for protecting kids in state custody.

WE THE PEOPLE DARE TO BE INFORMED ABOUT OUR WORLD, SO THAT WE CAN HOLD OUR GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE TO US.

Together, we’re shining a light on everyone from district attorneys to immigration officials, to remind them that they work for us.

Vote for justice. District attorneys have incredible influence over the course of criminal justice policy. They play a huge role in determining who ends up behind bars – deciding who will be charged with a crime, which crimes to prosecute or drop, and who gets a second chance through diversion or treatment programs. This year we joined ACLU affiliates across the nation in drawing attention to the power of DAs and how they impact our communities. We launched DAforME.com, a powerful tool allowing you to compare DA candidates across the state. And we held a series of candidate forums to get voters the information they need before heading to the polls.

Keeping border patrol in check. Local police are increasingly being asked to act as federal immigration agents, and Mainers are reporting increased presence of border patrol agents on the highways and even at bus stations. The public has the right to know how immigration agents are operating in our state. That’s why we’re in the middle of two lawsuits to force Customs and Border Protection to turn over records about its local practices. And our amazing volunteers have been at bus stations in Portland and Bangor, handing out our “Know Your Rights” flyers and making sure passengers know their constitutional rights still apply during interactions with agents.

WE THE PEOPLE DARE TO TAKE A STAND FOR WHAT WE BELIEVE IN, SO THAT ALL OF US MAY BE FREE.

Living while Black. Rory Ferreira and his family were denied service at a grocery store after Rory asked to speak with a manager. When the family returned home, a police officer was there to serve Rory a “no trespass” order on behalf of the store. Calls to the police about people of color simply going about their lives happen far too often, so we joined Rory to take a stand against racism in our communities. We have called on the store to conduct racial bias training for all of its employees, and to stop calling the police on people who have done nothing wrong. And we’re calling on Maine police departments to stop issuing “no trespass” orders without first investigating whether they are necessary.

Together, we’re fighting to extend the promises of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to all Mainers.

Speaking truth to power. Karin Leuthy and Kelli Whitlock Burton wanted to share their concerns with Gov. LePage on Facebook, but had their comments deleted and were blocked from his official page. We took their case, arguing that free speech must be protected from government censorship on social media just as is it in any other public forum. The case is moving forward, after a federal judge rejected the governor’s request to throw it out in August.

Reproductive justice for all. Maine’s courageous abortion providers want to ensure all Maine women have access to abortion, regardless of how much money they make or where they live. On their behalf, we filed two lawsuits to expand abortion access in Maine. One will allow advanced-practice nurse practitioners to provide abortion care. The other will end the ban on insurance coverage of abortion for women who qualify for MaineCare.

“WHY DO YOU SUPPORT THE ACLU?”

“The folks at the ACLU have so often been the ones who have spoken out, taken a stand, and fought back against injustice. I’m proud that we’ve been able to do that together. I’m proud to be a part of it.”- Dan Crewe, board member and supporter

“The ACLU fights to defend our civil liberties and rights on all fronts. As an aspiring lawyer, I want to be in that fight for liberty and justice for all.” - Dhivya Singaram, volunteer

“At the ACLU, I put my passion for social justice and equality to work.” - Reggie Parson, legal intern

“I volunteer at the ACLU of Maine so that the dollars I donate to the ACLU go farther against the intrusion of government on our civil liberties.” - Sam Schwartz, volunteer

“Interning at the ACLU gave me a chance to see what practicing lawyers do in the civil rights field, and to feel like I was part of moving these important issues forward.” - Allison Kuhns, legal intern

KEEP UP THE FIGHT FOR LIBERTY, EQUALITY AND JUSTICE IN MAINE.

Join the more than 10,000 people across Maine who are taking a stand against threats to our fundamental freedoms. Give to the ACLU of Maine.

3 WAYS TO MAKE YOUR GIFT

ONLINE

www.aclumaine.org/give

MAIL

ACLU of Maine 121 Middle St. Suite 200 Portland, ME 04101

LEAVE A LEGACY

Include the ACLU in your will now, and we’ll receive an immediate cash match. Contact legacy@aclu.org for more information.

Support and Revenue

Donations, Grants & Membership: $809,931

Bequests: $255,344

National ACLU: $296,096

Total: $1,361,371

Expenses

Programs: $846,493

Management & General: $168,444

Fundraising: $201,313

Total Expenses: $1,216,250

Other Changes in Net Assets

Investment & Other Income: $43,463

Realized & Unrealized Gains: $86,698

Consolidated audited statement of activities for the ACLU of Maine and the ACLU of Maine Foundation, Fiscal Year 2018 (April 1, 2017 - March 31, 2018)

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Susan Bates - President

Jodi Nofsinger - Vice President

Chris Branson - Treasurer

Nancy Fannon - Secretary, National Board Rep.

Robert E. Talbot - Equity Officer

Molly Butler Bailey

Sarah Bigney

Daniel N. Crewe

Sally Dobres

Joyce T. Gibson

Alli Harper

Robert Kelley

Colleen Khoury

Doug Kimmel

M. Calien Lewis

Susan Peck

Staff

Oamshri Amarasingham - Advocacy Director

Beth Ansheles - Finance Director

Alison Beyea - Executive Director

Emma Bond - Staff Attorney

Rachel Healy - Communications Director

Zachary Heiden - Legal Director

Ariel Kernis - Deputy Director

Amy Kuhn - Community Engagement Manager

Emma Findlen LeBlanc - Senior Researcher

Laura Retherford - Director of Leadership Gifts

Joelle Rutembesa - Administrative Associate

Margarita Salguero-Macklin - Office Manager

Meagan Sway - Policy Counsel

Published By

ACLU of Maine Foundation

121 Middle St. Suite 200

Portland, ME 04101

(207) 774-5444

info@aclumaine.org

www.aclumaine.org

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