Jon's blog

Jon

Each year the ACLU of Maine teaches over 100 workshops to students, which gives us plenty of chances to cite both new and old decisions by the Supreme Court. Hypotheticals can be fun, but students routinely tell us that they enjoy hearing about real cases - and why wouldn’t they? Disputes that make it to the Supreme Court are often fascinating, and the big cases involving students tend to be particularly juicy and ripe for debate.

Jon

It’s been nearly a year since Edward Snowden first began revealing just how abusive the government’s surveillance programs really are. Back then, Snowden was asked what his greatest fear was. While acknowledging obvious concerns for his own safety, he ultimately gave a much nobler answer: that “nothing will change.”

Jon

It’s been nearly a year since the Guardian and the Washington Post first began publishing reports based on leaks from Edward Snowden, and in the months that followed neither newspaper was immune from criticism.

Publishing articles that expose government misconduct and shine a light on previously undisclosed programs is never easy to do, and yet it is an essential public service protected by no less an authority than the U.S. Constitution.

Jon

Last year the ACLU released a groundbreaking report that chronicled in remarkable detail the vast racial injustices that persist throughout the United States with respect to enforcement of marijuana laws. It was not a pretty picture, but it was a story that had to be told.

Jon

This morning I met with members of a working group that’s organizing a yearlong series of events to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Jon

Just a few hours ago the ACLU was honored to host the first live interview with whistleblower Edward Snowden since his bombshell revelations about government spying last year. The “virtual conversation” took place at the SXSW Initiative, a massive technology festival held every year in Texas, and featured a highly-secure live video feed of Snowden.

Jon

As I write this blog, I’m gazing across the Saint John River onto the beautiful snowy slopes of the Canadian countryside. My location is Madawaska, a picturesque little community that proudly calls itself “the most northeastern town in the United States.” While one could certainly justify taking a vacation here, that is not my purpose. I’m here on an educational mission, and my objective is clear: teach tomorrow’s leaders about the Bill of Rights.

Jon

February 11th is a big day in mass surveillance. No, the government isn’t debuting round-the-clock aerial surveillance – although that could be coming soon. Rather, Tuesday is a big day because it’s a chance for us all to fight back against the idea that we should be watched and spied upon by our own government for no reason.

Jon

February is Black History Month and this year it carries some added weight due to a very special anniversary: It’s been 50 years since Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 – a landmark moment in the struggle against discrimination and inequality.

We’re part of a group that’s organizing a year-long series of events to commemorate this special anniversary, which will not only look back at what the Civil Rights Act meant in the 1960’s, but also look ahead to see how we can continue the movement towards equity and justice in the face of continued resistance.

Jon

Here in Maine, any loving couple that wants to get married can do so. But in most states around the country, that’s still not the case. The ACLU wants to highlight this unfair patchwork of state marriage laws, and so we’re doing the most fitting thing: we’re throwing some big, gay (il)legal weddings!

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